Documented – Define American

DocumentedLast night I attended a screening of the film, Documentedwritten, directed, and produced by Jose Antonio Vargas who is an undocumented American from the Philippines. His film was about his undocumented status and you wonder, why hasn’t he been deported? Well, he doesn’t pose a threat because he’s a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist, he pays taxes, and he has become a productive member of America.   Continue reading “Documented – Define American”

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Player Piano

imageAuthor: Kurt Vonnegut

Publisher: Dell Publishing (1952)

From Wikipedia:

“The novel follows Doctor Paul Proteus, an engineer at the Ilium Works. The novel takes place in an America of the future where machines run everything and do everything, making people almost afterthoughts. Specialization is the norm, and all of the wealthy upper-class people have doctorate level degrees, with eight years of schooling for everyone; consequently it creates a society of well-educated thinkers and not doers. Paul seems to be on his way up the ladder of success in this techno-utopia – a perfect wife, a fast-track position at Ilium Works and a shot at a major promotion. But he is plagued with doubts about what modern life has become. Through a strange series of events, Dr. Proteus joins a revolutionary organization called the Ghost Shirt Society and even becomes its leader, at least in name. These Ghost Shirts, their name taken from the Native American Ghost Dance, succeed in destroying much of Ilium’s mechanized infrastructure. Yet, they realize the lack of hope in their mission, and at the end it becomes clear that their goal was to give man hope instead of revolutionize society.” Continue reading “Player Piano”

Black, White, and Jewish

Author: Rebecca Walker Published by: Riverhead Books (2001) Rebecca is the product of a biracial and bicoastal home. In her memoir, she recounts her sexual experiences, her identity crisis (is she white, Jewish, or black?), and everything in between. What is missing in her memoir are the spaces in between – there weren’t enough instances […]

The Lacuna

Author: Barbara Kingsolver

Published by: HarperCollins Books (2009)

Harrison W. Shepherd is a half-breed of American (gringo) and Mexican. His mother left his American father in the 1920’s and moved to Mexico where they lived with one of her rich suitors. Soon after they left and lived with “Mr. Produce the Cash” as Harrison called him. Somewhere along the way, he meets Frida Kahlo, works for Diego Rivera, and Leon Trotsky where he is embroiled in their Communist Revolution involuntarily, working as their secretary and cook. Continue reading “The Lacuna”