Category Archives: Arts

Litquake and Lit Crawl

Last night, I participated in Lit Crawl because I was on the committee. I volunteered for Litquake two years ago when I arrived in the Bay Area from New York City.  Being a reader for as many years as I can recall, I didn’t particularly seek out literary events. Until I first volunteered with Litquake. And then again with Lit Crawl last night. Continue reading

What Makes a Good Live Show?

What is a good performance? I recently went to a few concerts back to back this past weekend, Live 105’s BFD and The Faint, respectively, and discussed a few performers from the BFD concert with a co-worker. Continue reading

Documented – Define American

DocumentedLast night I attended a screening of the film, Documentedwritten, directed, and produced by Jose Antonio Vargas who is an undocumented American from the Philippines. His film was about his undocumented status and you wonder, why hasn’t he been deported? Well, he doesn’t pose a threat because he’s a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist, he pays taxes, and he has become a productive member of America.   Continue reading

Top Ten Paul McCartney Beatles songs

I’m sure anyone who’s a Bealtemaniac or just a Beatles fan, has their favorite Beatle in addition to their favorite songs. My favorite Beatle is John with Paul McCartney coming in at third place (George is 2nd), and Ringo is last (even though I adored him in A Hard Day’s Night).

In celebration of Sir Paul McCartney coming back to the Bay Area to play at the soon to be demolished Candlestick Park, site of the last venue the Beatles ever performed in 1966, I compiled my favorite songs in which Paul sang lead vocals. I have more songs (that’s another post) while will be unveiled on his birthday along with the other Beatles on their respective birthdays. Behold my favorite top ten by Sir Paul McCartney! Continue reading

A.C.T. Stuck Elevator Review

large_Stuck_elevator

I recently went to see Stuck Elevator at the American Conservatory Theater recently. Having gone and seen Dead Metaphor, which for this New Yorker was DOA, I was skeptical about this 90 minute play about a Chinese illegal immigrant’s experience being trapped in a Bronx elevator. To say I was actually surprised to have enjoyed the picture was an understatement. The subtitles in both English and Chinese was a delight. I kept studying the Chinese characters and promised myself I would venture out and learn some Chinese when I had the time. The songs were catchy, melodic, and funny. The acting was absolutely superb. Additionally, the  set design which consisted of a scant elevator fixture in the middle of the stage was utilized masterfully by every actor in the cast. Continue reading

Letters to a Young Artist

Edited by: Peter Nesbett, Sarah Andress, and Shelly Bancroft

Published by: Darte Publishing LLC (2006)

A young artist asked a group of established artists “Is it possible to maintain one’s integrity and freedom of thought and still participate in the art world?” and this pocket sized books contains written responses from these writers. The book contains letters from Jo Baer, John Bladessari, Cai Guo-Qiang, Yoko Ono, Yvonne Rainer, Adrian Piper, William Pope. L and many more.

Not being familiar with 85% of these artists, I couldn’t gauge the level of their popularity. Their messages about art were consistent across the board – as an artist, just Do. At least this is the message that I culled from the small book.

As a writer, I was able to relate to the advice and support these artists provided to the “young artist.” At the end of the day, all artists must create, love what they do, put aside the monetary success, and express themselves the only way they know how to in their medium. I think every artist should own this and read it as their own support group. In the vein that Writing Down the Bones and Bird by Bird are compassionate to the budding and accomplished writer, Letters to a Young Artist provide the same sentiment to aspiring and accomplished artists everywhere. To have an idea of what some of the letters are like, read Yoko Ono’s letter here.

In short, an inspiring nugget that reassures every artist why they are doing the work in the first place; they hear it from those who have been there and know what to expect in their future.

Joseph Gridgely says it best: “It’s the stuff that has nothing to do with art that has everything to do with art.”

Rain: Beatles Tribute Band on Broadway

On May 18, 2011, I watched the Beatles Tribute band Rain on Broadway. With my newfound Beatlemania, one of my close friends who is also a Beatlemaniac, invited me to watch the tribute band to see how much they would be able to recreate the sixties and how well their covers would be, of course. It was his fourth time attending.

The show was absolutely perfect for this Beatles fan and any Beatlemaniac for that matter. Prior to the band starting, the audience is sitting with a soundtrack from the sixties and Beatles trivia on the two TV screens on each side of the stage. Continue reading